Long Wharf

Title

Long Wharf

Description

In its original design, the Long Wharf extended approximately 1/3 to ½ mile into the Boston Harbor. The port served both international and coastal trade and was one of the leading ports throughout all of the colonies. Daniel Neal, a Boston clergyman, described the wharf as “the pier runs so far into the Bay that Ships of the greatest Burden may unlade without the Help of Boat or Lighters.” One section of the wharf that Neal was pointing to was the T-Wharf. It was built on the Northern side of the wharf and served as an unloading dock for larger ships that required deeper waters. In addition to docks, private merchants and public officials constructed warehouses and storefronts on the wharf to deal directly with off-loading ships. The Maritime History of Massachusetts, operating under The National Park Service, concluded that the ability to buy directly from merchants on the wharf created a marketplace environment long before Faneuil Hall was constructed.

Over time landfill projects have greatly reduced the exposure the wharf has to the harbor. Beginning in the 1820s, under the approval of Mayor Quincy, private construction firms gradually brought the shoreline outward. Today, much of the shipping traffic has moved elsewhere in the city of Boston and Long Wharf remains primarily as a tourist attraction. The Wharf is maintained by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, who took control during the 1960s when the area was in need of renovation.

Source

http://maps.bpl.org/id/m8625

Contributor

Conor Flannery

Relation

Neal, Daniel. "Descriptions of Eighteenth-Century Boston before the Revolution." National Humanities Center. http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/becomingamer/growth/text2/bostondescriptions.pdf (accessed April 6, 2014).


"Long Wharf and Custom House Block, featured in Maritime History of Massachusetts--A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary." National Parks Service. http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/maritime/lon.htm (accessed April 6, 2014).

Type

Annotation

Identifier

42.360297, -71.048199

Description

In its original design, the Long Wharf extended approximately 1/3 to ½ mile into the Boston Harbor. The port served both international and coastal trade and was one of the leading ports throughout all of the colonies. Daniel Neal, a Boston clergyman, described the wharf as “the pier runs so far into the Bay that Ships of the greatest Burden may unlade without the Help of Boat or Lighters.” One section of the wharf that Neal was pointing to was the T-Wharf. It was built on the Northern side of the wharf and served as an unloading dock for larger ships that required deeper waters. In addition to docks, private merchants and public officials constructed warehouses and storefronts on the wharf to deal directly with off-loading ships. The Maritime History of Massachusetts, operating under The National Park Service, concluded that the ability to buy directly from merchants on the wharf created a marketplace environment long before Faneuil Hall was constructed.

Over time landfill projects have greatly reduced the exposure the wharf has to the harbor. Beginning in the 1820s, under the approval of Mayor Quincy, private construction firms gradually brought the shoreline outward. Today, much of the shipping traffic has moved elsewhere in the city of Boston and Long Wharf remains primarily as a tourist attraction. The Wharf is maintained by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, who took control during the 1960s when the area was in need of renovation.

Source

http://maps.bpl.org/id/m8625