Trinity Church

Title

Trinity Church

Description

In search of an alternative to Puritan and non-conformist congregational churches, Bostonians built Kings Chapel and Christ Church in 1688 and 1723, respectively. According to a map produced by John Bonner in 1722, Boston had grown to nearly 12,000 people and was the largest town in British North America. As a result of the continued population increase and a necessity to relieve the overcrowding of Kings Chapel, Leonard Vassall purchased a plot of land for the creation of an Anglican church. On April 25, 1728, Vassall conveyed the plot of land on Summer Street worth four hundred and fifty pounds five shillings to John Barnes, John Gibbons, and William Speakman for what would become an Episcopal Church.
Work began on the new church in 1733 and the cornerstone of what would become Trinity Church was laid on April 15, 1734. Trinity Church was the Third Anglican parish in Boston. The church stood ninety feet long, 60 feet broad with no steeple, and three entrances in the front. Phillips Brooks would describe the churches appearance as “of such exemplary plainness as would delight the souls of those who grudge the House of God the touch of beauty.” The first sermon was preached on August 15, 1735 by Reverend Mr. Roger Price from the 10th Chapter of the Hebrews 23rd verse. The church would have several preachers conduct mass, until 1740 when Reverend Addington Davenport was appointed. Among the notable proprietors of the time were Peter Faneuil; who’s daughter Maria would marry Reverend Addington during his time as Rector.
Trinity Church would be the only Anglican Church to remain open during the Revolutionary War. On December 23, 1804 the Wardens of the church voted to create a fund for the relief of the Widows and orphan children of the clergy of Trinity Church, following the death of Reverend Doctor Samuel Parker. On February 18, 1828 it was decided that the “old and combustible” Trinity Church would be replaced by a new and enlarged church to be built by George W. Brimmer for no more than the price of forty thousand dollars. For the two-year period that the new church was being built, services were held at Boylston Hall. The new church building was completed in 1835 and services would be held in this building until the Great Fire on November 9, 1872 destroyed the building. The Wardens of the church had previously purchased a plot of land and Henry Hobson Richardson was hired to construct the new Trinity Church. The Church would be completed in 1877 and still stands in that location in Copley Square today.

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/97

Date

1735

Contributor

Zachary Krause

Relation

Adam Babcock, Benja. Greene, Rufus G. Amory, Stepn. Higginson, David Greene, Stepn. Codman, Jonathan Jackson, Fund to relieve Widows and Orphan Children of the Clergy, 1804, “The Records of Trinity Church Boston: 172801830. Edited by Andrew Oliver and James Bishop Peabody. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1980.

Brown, Abraham English. “Faneuil Hall and Faneuil Hall Market or Peter Faneuil and His Gift.” Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1849.

John, Bonner. The Town of Boston in New England. Boston: William Price, 1722.

O’ Gorman, James F. The Makers of Trinity Church in the City of Boston. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2004.

Parker, Samuel D, Vote for Spending on February 18, 1828, “The Records of Trinity Church Boston: 172801830. Edited by Andrew Oliver and James Bishop Peabody. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1980.

Peaboyd, James Bishop. Historical Introduction to The Records of Trinity Church Boston: 1728-1830. Edited by Andrew Oliver. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1980.

Vassall, Leonard, Text of Deed, 1728, “The Records of Trinity Church Boston:1728-1830.” Edited by Andrew Oliver and James Bishop Peabody. Boston: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 1980.

Type

Annotation

Identifier

-71.059591, 42.3555284

Description

In search of an alternative to Puritan and non-conformist congregational churches, Bostonians built Kings Chapel and Christ Church in 1688 and 1723, respectively. According to a map produced by John Bonner in 1722, Boston had grown to nearly 12,000 people and was the largest town in British North America. As a result of the continued population increase and a necessity to relieve the overcrowding of Kings Chapel, Leonard Vassall purchased a plot of land for the creation of an Anglican church. On April 25, 1728, Vassall conveyed the plot of land on Summer Street worth four hundred and fifty pounds five shillings to John Barnes, John Gibbons, and William Speakman for what would become an Episcopal Church.
Work began on the new church in 1733 and the cornerstone of what would become Trinity Church was laid on April 15, 1734. Trinity Church was the Third Anglican parish in Boston. The church stood ninety feet long, 60 feet broad with no steeple, and three entrances in the front. Phillips Brooks would describe the churches appearance as “of such exemplary plainness as would delight the souls of those who grudge the House of God the touch of beauty.” The first sermon was preached on August 15, 1735 by Reverend Mr. Roger Price from the 10th Chapter of the Hebrews 23rd verse. The church would have several preachers conduct mass, until 1740 when Reverend Addington Davenport was appointed. Among the notable proprietors of the time were Peter Faneuil; who’s daughter Maria would marry Reverend Addington during his time as Rector.
Trinity Church would be the only Anglican Church to remain open during the Revolutionary War. On December 23, 1804 the Wardens of the church voted to create a fund for the relief of the Widows and orphan children of the clergy of Trinity Church, following the death of Reverend Doctor Samuel Parker. On February 18, 1828 it was decided that the “old and combustible” Trinity Church would be replaced by a new and enlarged church to be built by George W. Brimmer for no more than the price of forty thousand dollars. For the two-year period that the new church was being built, services were held at Boylston Hall. The new church building was completed in 1835 and services would be held in this building until the Great Fire on November 9, 1872 destroyed the building. The Wardens of the church had previously purchased a plot of land and Henry Hobson Richardson was hired to construct the new Trinity Church. The Church would be completed in 1877 and still stands in that location in Copley Square today.

Date

1735

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/97