Sandemanian Meeting House

Title

Sandemanian Meeting House

Description

The Sandemanian Meeting House served as the second meeting place for the small sect of Christians that identified as "Sandemanian". The Sandemanian doctrine arose from the teachings of Robert Sandeman, who believed that strict adherence to the gospel was the only way to arrive at truth and that many Christian preachers of the time were ignoring this fact. His theology was praised by some, and criticized by mean for presuming that Sandemanian congregations were the only true churches of Christ.

Sandeman left his home in Scotland to build congregations in America. After developing churches in Portsmouth, NH and Danbury, CT, Sandeman arrived in Boston in May of 1765, which resulted in the quick formation of a congregation, who had their own meetinghouse by 1769 after spending the previous years meeting in the home of Edward Foster, who was high ranking member of the congregation. The original meeting house, located on Mill Pond, burned down on April 4, 1773. The rights to the property were sold that same month to Joseph Kettle of Boston, and new location was secured. The new location was a 1080 square foot house on Middle Street, and the exact date of which congregation begin to worship there is uncertain. From 1785 to 1790 the building was rented during the weekdays for a school for Samuel Cheney.

The Sandemanians were loyal to the King, and, with the dawn of the American Revolution, many fled New England. The Sandemanian congregation of Boston was greatly weakened, and was alleged to have as few as 6 members by 1817. The meetinghouse survived until 1823 when it was abandoned after dwindling numbers. The congregation was alleged to have survived until 1828 and was dissolved with the death of their last member, Alford Butler. The meeting house was converted into a primary school. In 1824, Middle Street was converted into what is currently Hanover Street.

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/97

Date

1769

Contributor

Aria Rad

Relation

Casey, Michael W., and Douglas A. Foster. The Stone-Campbell Movement: An International Religious Tradition. University of Tennessee Press, 2002.

Fuller, Andrew. Strictures on Sandemanianism : in twelve letters to a friend (1811). 1811.

Massachusetts Record Commission, . Report of the Commissioner of Public Records for the Year.... Wright & Potter Printing Co., 1898. http://books.google.com/books/reader?id=3k0OAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&pg=GBS.PR1 (accessed April 13, 2014).

"Monday, April 5. Boston." The Massachusetts Spy , April 8, 1773. Proquest

Snow, Caleb Hopkins. A History of Boston: The Metropolis of Massachusetts, from Its Origin to the Present Period; with Some Account of the Environs . 1828.

Walker, Williston. The Sandemanians of New England. 1902. https://archive.org/details/sandem00walk (accessed April 2, 2014).

Type

annotation

Identifier

-71.055247, 42.362896

Description

The Sandemanian Meeting House served as the second meeting place for the small sect of Christians that identified as "Sandemanian". The Sandemanian doctrine arose from the teachings of Robert Sandeman, who believed that strict adherence to the gospel was the only way to arrive at truth and that many Christian preachers of the time were ignoring this fact. His theology was praised by some, and criticized by mean for presuming that Sandemanian congregations were the only true churches of Christ.

Sandeman left his home in Scotland to build congregations in America. After developing churches in Portsmouth, NH and Danbury, CT, Sandeman arrived in Boston in May of 1765, which resulted in the quick formation of a congregation, who had their own meetinghouse by 1769 after spending the previous years meeting in the home of Edward Foster, who was high ranking member of the congregation. The original meeting house, located on Mill Pond, burned down on April 4, 1773. The rights to the property were sold that same month to Joseph Kettle of Boston, and new location was secured. The new location was a 1080 square foot house on Middle Street, and the exact date of which congregation begin to worship there is uncertain. From 1785 to 1790 the building was rented during the weekdays for a school for Samuel Cheney.

The Sandemanians were loyal to the King, and, with the dawn of the American Revolution, many fled New England. The Sandemanian congregation of Boston was greatly weakened, and was alleged to have as few as 6 members by 1817. The meetinghouse survived until 1823 when it was abandoned after dwindling numbers. The congregation was alleged to have survived until 1828 and was dissolved with the death of their last member, Alford Butler. The meeting house was converted into a primary school. In 1824, Middle Street was converted into what is currently Hanover Street.

Date

1769

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/97