Fox Hill Battery

Title

Fox Hill Battery

Description

Fox Hill was a small hill on the shore of Back Bay at the foot of Boston Common and was estimated to be twenty feet above tide level. Although the shape and location of the hill steadily changed over time, it was always a source of sand for people who wanted to use a small amount for purposes such as fill or mortar. Since Fox Hill was town public land, the selectman of Boston tried to stop people from digging sand from it, but the practice continued anyway, particularly at night. Meeting records of the Boston selectman frequently cited that people from Cambridge would come across the river and steal sizeable quantities of sand. The constant digging caused Fox Hill to gradually become reduced, but it still was one of Boston Common’s prominent features and its height made it a strategic defensive position. For that reason, the British soldiers fortified Fox Hill and made it the site of one of their batteries when the American Revolutionary War began and Boston was besieged by the Continental Army in 1775.

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/3

Date

1775

Contributor

Cameron Boutin

Relation

Kaye, Clifford. The Geology and Early History of the Boston Area of Massachusetts, A Bicentennial Approach. United States: United States Government Printing Office, 1976.

 

“Fox Hill Plaque.” Boston Art Commission, 2010. Web. 19 March 2014. < http://www.publicartboston.com/content/fox-hill-plaque >.

Type

annotation

Identifier

-71.06778, 42.35373

Description

Fox Hill was a small hill on the shore of Back Bay at the foot of Boston Common and was estimated to be twenty feet above tide level. Although the shape and location of the hill steadily changed over time, it was always a source of sand for people who wanted to use a small amount for purposes such as fill or mortar. Since Fox Hill was town public land, the selectman of Boston tried to stop people from digging sand from it, but the practice continued anyway, particularly at night. Meeting records of the Boston selectman frequently cited that people from Cambridge would come across the river and steal sizeable quantities of sand. The constant digging caused Fox Hill to gradually become reduced, but it still was one of Boston Common’s prominent features and its height made it a strategic defensive position. For that reason, the British soldiers fortified Fox Hill and made it the site of one of their batteries when the American Revolutionary War began and Boston was besieged by the Continental Army in 1775.

Date

1775

Source

http://bostonmaps.neu.edu/omeka/admin/items/show/3